Title

Inattentional blindness: A combination of a relational set and a feature inhibition set?

Document Type

Article

Publication Date

7-1-2016

Abstract

Two experiments were conducted to directly test the feature set hypothesis and the relational set hypothesis in an inattentional blindness task. The feature set hypothesis predicts that unexpected objects that match the to-be-attended stimuli will be reported most. The relational set hypothesis predicts that unexpected objects that match the relationship between the to-be-attended and the to-be-ignored stimuli will be reported the most. Experiment 1 manipulated the luminance of the stimuli. Participants were instructed to monitor the gray letter shapes and to ignore either black or white letter shapes. The unexpected objects that exhibited the luminance relation of the to-be-attended to the to-be-ignored stimuli were reported by participants the most. Experiment 2 manipulated the color of the stimuli. Participants were instructed to monitor the yellower orange or the redder orange letter shapes and to ignore the redder orange or yellower letter shapes. The unexpected objects that exhibited the color relation of the to-be-attended to the to-be-ignored stimuli were reported the most. The results do not support the use of a feature set to accomplish the task and instead support the use of a relational set. In addition, the results point to the concurrent use of multiple attentional sets that are both excitatory and inhibitory. © 2016, The Psychonomic Society, Inc.

DOI

10.3758/s13414-016-1091-x

First Page

1245

Last Page

1254

Volume

78

Issue

5

Publication Title

Attention, Perception, and Psychophysics

ISSN

19433921

Comments

At the time of publication, Rebecca R. Goldstein was affiliated with Louisiana State University.

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